why did you make this, alesia?

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As a stand up comedian, a woman, and a person of color, I felt the need and responsibility to put into words my feelings about the turmoil going on in the world, but in a darkly comedic way. I wanted to comment on the state of society -- the racist, sexist, trans/homophobic trauma in everyday life, but from a perspective that was seemingly removed, yet invested, like one would imagine a guardian angel is. As someone who grew up in the church, I found the idea of guardian angels really interesting -- a being who'd be on Earth, observing what's going on, but who wasn't human. I also found the notion hilarious that in our deepest, and most embarrassing moments there could be someone watching, laughing, rooting for, and side-eyeing us. And so I wrote my feelings of frustration and curiosity, mixed with jokes about a quirky, misunderstood boy (Creepy Charlie) through the voice of a hippy (and arguably crazy) guardian angel. Creepy Charlie is a little black boy who seemingly doesn't have much going for him, but who's purpose is to be the future 3rd black president.

I want to drive home this idea that no one is without hope, and no one can predict or speak ill-will on someone's future, because as humans we just don't have that power to do so. But these angel-characters in Avant-Guardians not only believe their human is going to be great, but they know it; and, I found that idea, regardless of religious or non-religious beliefs, comforting.  I  also wanted a non-traditional and comedic take on this religious setting. I wanted black women portrayed as divine, and although I don't believe there is race within angels, as the actresses are of color and the writer (me) is of color, I proudly leaned into the things that matter to my community, while neither being judgemental, preachy, nor aggressive, but accessible through comedy. 


The concept is Avant-Garde, and so are the characters.